Home / Lifestyle / Idanre Hills a wonder of nature and a marvellous tourist attraction

Idanre Hills a wonder of nature and a marvellous tourist attraction

OLD IDANRE TOWN/ HILLS, ONDO STATE: said to be 800 years old and reached by 667 steps with spectacular views overlooking the new town of Idanre. The Owa’s Palace has a fine courtyard with carved figures and doors

The historic Idanre hills represent one of the wonders of nature and a marvelous tourist attraction. Located in the ancient town of Idanre, South-West, Nigeria, this destination is so strategically located at about 15km southwest of Akure, the state capital.
There is the ancient town, which is at the hill top and the new settlement at the hill.

The Idanre hills, which are steep-sided, smooth and dome-shape in nature, present an awe-inspiring sight. The different hills were named after some historical figures in the socio-cultural evolution of Idanre land some of these are the Olofin and Orosun hills named after Olofin, the pioneer Oba of Oke-Idanre and his queen respectively

The Aghagha hill is very peculiar because it has a very wonderful footprint named Aghgun into which visitor put their feet. It is believed that anybody whose feet do not exactly fit into the footprint is considered to be a witch or wizard. There is also Carter Hills named after a former Colonial Governor who signed a peace treaty with the Oba of Idanre in 1891. The Ajimoba Hill was named after a gateman, while the Orosun Hill was named after an ill-fated daughter of a great warrior who killed his daughter in fulfillment of his promise to sacrifice the first living thing that comes his way if he should be victorious in his war exploit. The girl was buried near the Ilesun Hill and every year, there is a commemoration ceremony on the hill by children of her age. Idanre Hills in the past offered protection against invaders and are worshipped annually. The cultural relics in terms of gods, goddesses and traditional arts crafts can still be seen in addition to the old palace built around the 17th century.

To get to the top of the hill, tourists will have to climb 667 steps with five resting posts along the steps where tourists can take a rest. The steps and resting places had been reconstructed while the notable historical monuments such as the old primary school, native court, the mausoleum, the Owa’s secretary’s office, the Oloris’ quarters and the ancient palace had all been restored.

In order to complement the tourism potentials of Idanre Hills the Government has embarked on the construction of an 18’ hole golf course at Atosin-Idanre and a 40 bedroom hotel in collaboration with a private investor. Government is also making arrangements with the National Commission on Museums and Monuments, Abuja to enlist Idanre Hills on the prestigious UNESCO World Heritage list.

TOURIST SITES IN IDANRE:

 

[The Owa Cave] [ Arun River and the wooden bridge lying across it ] [ Boulders of granite, covered with Bat guano inside the cave ]
[Relaxing inside the Owa Cave] [ The chief priest leading the sacrificial procession at Old-Oke Idanre during orosun festival ] [ “The Wonderful Mat” rock at Old Oke-Idanre ]
[Inscription on a rockface in Old Oke-Idanre] [ Inscriptions on a close-up ] [ Entrance to Owa Cave ]
[Inside Omi Iwo Cave] [ First Primary school in Old Oke-Idanre ] [ Tourists swimming at the Idanre hilltop waterfall ]
[ 3D Satellite image (DEM) of Idanre Hills. (1- Old Oke-Idanre; 2- Ojimoba Inselberg; 3- Orosun Peak; 4- Arun River) ] [ Arun River- Idanre Hills ] [ Tourists swimming at the plunge pool of the Idanre hilltop waterfall ]

About Hafeez Oshundairo

He is a graduate of Ajayi Crowther University (B.SC Mass Communication) Honest and hardworking personnel. An inspirational writer, Story writer, PR and media personnel. Loves meeting people with no gender or race barrier. Read more about Hafeez Oshundairo https://about.me/young_prhafeez https://myaccount.google.com/?utm_source=OGB

Check Also

My Encounter with a Yoruba Demon (3)

BY: LINDA ADENIYI Read: My Encounter With Yoruba Demon (1) Read: My Encounter With Yoruba …

Leave a Reply